Endodontic Treatment

Endodontic treatment involves the pulp of a tooth, with content of nerve tissues and blood vessels that provide oxygen and nutrients supply. When the tooth is injured or infected, endodontic treatment is done to save the tooth.

Even though milk teeth eventually will fall out, your dentist will suggest repairing them unless they would fall out naturally soon. Milk teeth are important to guide the developing permanent teeth that replace them. If your child loses a milk tooth too soon, neighbouring teeth could move into the empty space, and eventually block the permanent tooth from coming in, or cause it to grow in tilted.

There are two types of endodontic treatment for milk teeth. Vital pulp therapy is the procedure to remove the pulp from crown portion of the tooth, and the pulp tissue in the root portion remains alive. A non-vital pulp therapy (a.k.a root canal treatment) is the procedure to remove the pulp tissue from both the crown and root portion.

However, the tooth has to be extracted, if neither of the treatment is success.

Root Canal Treatment

Endodontic therapy (root canal therapy) treats teeth with infected or inflamed pulp, which involves the removing of the damaged pulp tissue and replacing that part with an inert material before restoring the crown (cap). Upon completion of the treatment, even though the non-vital tooth have no sense of hot, cold, or sweet but can still be responsive to biting force and function normally.

During the procedures, your dentist carefully numbs the tooth, removes the infected pulp, carefully cleans and shapes the internal part of the tooth, then fills and seals the sterile space to prevent further infection and discomfort. A crown restoration is advisable to protect the endodontically treated tooth in a long term wise. Thus, an endodontic treatment requires a few visits that depend on the severity of the pulp infection and follow-up procedures.